Grow Fertilizer

This is the natural farming plant growth formula. This formula is effective not only for the Nitrogen it supplies, but more importantly for the growth promoting enzymes and hormones it contains. Chlorophyll in leaves is not broken down in oil or in water. They require weak alcohol in order to be broken down. Fermentation produces some alcohol as a byproduct, which breaks down leaves and releases those enzymes and hormones. This is an awesome product not only by itself, but when used in conjunction with other nutrients.


***For an illustrated example of this recipe, check out the farm log here. The flog has all kinds of good stuff, sign up to get the updates via email!***

How to Make:
This is really a combination of fish hydrolysate and fermented plant extract. Fish hydrolysate is used because it’s high in Nitrogen, a principal element needed by growing plants. It’s also rich in many vitamins, minerals, oils, etc. The plant extracts provide the growth hormones along with essential macro- and micro-nutrients.

  1. Our grow formula uses 1:1 fermented plant material and fish hydrolysate. Learn to make your own fish hydrolysate.
  2. Instructions for fermented plant extract:

  3. Find a fast-growing plant in your area. It must be a green-color plant, fresh juicy succulent leaves are best.
  4. Collect a bunch of the growing tips of the plant. The green leaves give you Nitrogen, the growing tips give you the growth hormones. We try not to wash them for you may wash off those microbes too. We want the photosynthetic bacteria that naturally occur on the leaf surface of these fast-growing plants (phyllosphere microbes).
  5. Weigh the amount of material you’ve collected and add roughly half that weight in sugar.
  6. Put in a clay jar or plastic container.
  7. If fermenting a large batch, put a large rock on top of the material to push it down into the bottom of the container. After at least 5 hours, remove the rock, and cover the container with a newspaper/cheese cloth/etc and secure with string/rubber-band.
  8. If fermenting a smaller batch, you can add water. Add at least enough water to cover the material but if you want to add more no problem.
  9. Keep container out of direct sunlight. Solution will be fermented in approximately 7-15 days (depending on temperature).
  10. After that time, drain the liquid and put in plastic bottle, leaving 1/3 empty so organisms can breathe.
  11. DON’T TIGHTEN lid for at least 2 weeks or so. Wait till tiny bubble disappear and then close the container tightly.
  12. Note: if you observe un-dissolved sugar in the bottom it means fermentation did not go to completion. Add a little water to reactivate and leave lid off for a few days.

Notes on this fermented plant extract:

  1. To use on it’s own, mix 1Tbsp/L or 4tbsp/gallon.
  2. Apply as foliar spray in morning or evening when temp is lower . During the middle of the day when sunlight is highest, the plant stomata are closed (to preserve moisture), thus the intake of our foliar spray becomes difficult and less effective.
  3. Plant material can be used as animal feed or compost.
  4. Extract should have a sweet, sour, and even alcoholic smell and taste. Yes, you can taste it no problem but make sure to smell it first! Make sure it doesn’t smell foul – in that case you screwed something up and will have to start over. It should keep forever technically. Will be progressively more vinegary but no problem.
  5. TIP: This recipe is for your generalized growth promotant. If you want something specific to your plant type, use your plant type in the recipe. If growing tomatoes, use the growing tips of a tomato plant!



How to use complete grow formula:
So now you’ve made your own fish hydrolysate that’s loaded with Nitrogen and trace elements, not to mention fats and oils that will feed teeming fungal/bacterial hordes that’ll protect and nourish your plant; along with your own natural plant extract, full of growth hormones and stimulating enzymes, that will get your plants growing full and green!

Now it’s really up to you what ratio you mix your plant extract and fish hydrolysate. I mix mine 1:1, that is 1 part homemade fish hydrolysate to 1 part fermented plant growth stimulant. But again, everything is relative. The more you know and understand the materials, their active ingredients, the more you will be able to determine their appropriate use. Hypothesize, experiment, report back! Have fun!

Mix 1 Tbsp/gal

  • Apply once per week or as necessary
  • Apply as foliar spray in morning/evening
  • Apply as soil drench anytime
  • Mix with BIM for enhanced effectiveness

  • Big Ray

    I wish you would also add the equivalent US measurement in these instructions. I have never used metric measurements and find it very difficult to go to a conversion chart several times while I read each great article.

    This is some incredible information. I have already started some ferments going!

    • Patrick

      Haha gosh that is my number one constructive criticism so far. I’m going to go through all these recipes and fix the measurements. I’m also thinking of putting a converter box thing at the top of each article. You can get quick conversions from google by typing simple commands eg. “15ml to tbsp” or “25cl to gal” or whatever, but I know it’s a pain, again I’ll be fixing these up as I can.

    • Tom

      Gosh well welcome to the dilemma of the rest of the world ! Most of the world apart from the US is now metric so suck it up ! If we can cope with imperial measures used by you yanks, you can cope with the metric system !!!

      • Patrick

        Hahaha well I will try to use both where I can. Still have to revise these recipes accordingly..

  • Big Ray

    Because I live near vast brackish marshes, I have access to literally “tons” of water hyacinth and other invasive aquatic plants. The water hyacinth is known for having an affinity for metals.

    Would adding water hyacinth and it’s high(ish) concentration of metals be good or bad for use in this product? If not this product, is there a specific use that water hyacinth is good for?

    I know this question is a little off-topic but, would it be OK to apply water hyacinth over my soil as a mulch while still green? Right from the water to my garden?

    Thanks for your patience with all of the questions!

    • Patrick

      Ha, good question don’t know much about the plant. It does take up metals and toxins, if those are present in the water. I’d think about the water it’s in and how much pollutants are likely to be there. It is used as a feedstock in many countries apparently although they say not to over use.

      But jeez, looking at the info on it, what an awesome plant to use for this stuff! Grows incredibly fast, produces tons of seeds, and roots support an amazing bacterial community. Awesome! I’d ferment the buds to produce a flower inducer, seeds for fruiting formula, stolons(runners) for your grow formula, and figure out some way to capture those root zone bacteria. At least take a bunch of growing roots and ferment them for a root growth stimulant.

      If you have an co-op extension office near you maybe they could help determine it it’s safe? Or you could do all the fermentation and send samples of final products in to be tested, that’s probably what I’d do just out of curiosity. Not sure how concentration in tissues translates to concentration in fermented extract.

  • edi

    Can this fertilizer apply in brackishwater aquaculture?

    • Patrick

      Good question Edi, the microbes might not do well in saline water but the beneficial enzymes and hormones, vitamins and minerals would probably be fine. Health of the microbes would probably depend on level of salinity..

  • Diane

    Could I ferment it in a glass jar? that is what I ferment all of my lactofermented food in dill pickles, sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir.

    • Patrick

      Hi Diane, yep for sure you can ferment in a glass vessel that’s a great way. Just make sure you dont tighten the lid all the way. Should be tight enough to keep it fairly anaerobic, but let excess air out so it doesnt explode. Of course if you have a one-way valve or airlock that would be ideal.

  • BillFoster

    Wow, I’ve been working on FPE’s LactoBacillus, BIM’s etc. and spending hrs going from site to site trying to find one that covers it all.

    How did I miss this one over the past few months? Great info, great instructions and recipes, intelligent Q&A without any unfriendly comments and such.

    Great site, Great job. Thank You so much! I’ll be visiting regularly :)

    • Patrick

      Thanks Bill! Sign up for the Flog to be at the front line of news regarding this stuff. Right now it’s about a garden project of mine that covers basic utilization of these recipes, but there will be updates from Gil also.

      Anyway welcome, glad you’re enjoying the site!

  • Joe

    Hello and great info. Towards the end of the sentence on step 4, it says “add roughly half that weight in sugar”. What kind of sugar were you talking about? Brown sugar, cane sugar, powdered sugar, etc. and will the type of sugar used affect the end results (better/worst)? Also, I have unsulphured molasses, can I substitute the sugar for molasses?

    • Patrick

      Hey Joe, great question. Thanks for joining us, join the mailing list! So with regard to your question, any sugar source will work – brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, honey, syrup, you can use any. BUT, some types are better than others. For example brown sugar is better than white sugar. The more unrefined the better, since those have more micronutrients in them. And in that vein, molasses is an awesome sugar source! Maybe the best you can use actually! So, go for it.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

      • Joe

        Thank you. I have flowers that grows rapidly with nice dark green waxy leaves, can I use those for growth? Or should I save it for the bloom recipe for the flowering stage, since the plant being flowers too?

        • Patrick

          Hey Joe,

          Yep, as long as it’s a fast-growing plant and it’s in the growth stage (not bloom stage), that should be fine. Use the brighter green growing tips of the plant for the recipe. Once it blooms, you can use those for the bloom recipe.

          Cheers,
          Patrick

  • Mark

    Hi, can you use the grass clippings, especially a fast growing grass like kikuyu. Then use to spray back on the grass. Regards

    • Patrick

      Hi Mark,

      Yes for sure you can, that is a great idea and one of the things we recommend. It has the nutrients that it requires in it already, it is best used on itself, like mother’s milk to a baby. Go for it. Let us know how it goes. And join the mailing list!

      Patrick

  • vicnz

    hi. thanks for very informative site. especially for me who is starting organics gardening.
    I have a question about the amount of water to put in as I cant find any in the recipe. thanks again.

    • Patrick

      Traditionally you don’t add water for this recipe. However if you want to add water that is fine. I like adding a little water so I end up with a little more product, and you don’t have to dilute it as much then.

      Just make sure the water is non-chlorinated!

  • Henry

    Patrick,

    Do you or Gil know of a method to ferment alfalfa pellets? Any info will be helpful by anyone. Many thanks!

    • Patrick

      No problem there Henry. I’m not sure of a specific method but this is how I would do it:

      1. Weigh the pellets dry, and weigh out 1/3 that of sugar(or equivalent volume molasses). Set this aside.
      2. Add enough water to re-hydrate the pellets AND form a slurry of at least semi-liquid consistency.
      3. Add sugar and a little lacto to the slurry
      4. Ferment to completion
      5. Drain liquid off with a fine mesh cloth, press to get all liquid out
      6. The solids leftover after fermentation, either add more sugar/water/lacto and ferment again, or add to a compost pile with BIM and Grow and a carbon source like dried leaves/sawdust/etc – should decompose VERY quickly
      6. Use liquid at 1tbsp/gal (although this depends how much water you added above, it’s what I would start with) as a foliar spray. Use composted dry materials as topdressing.
      7. Now you’re really maximizing your alfalfa pellets. ha ha

      Hope that gives you some ideas. Let us know how it goes! Should be great.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Henry

    Patrick,

    Thank you very much for your quick response, and I basically got it started as per your instructions. In addition to foliar spray, I plan on using it as a drench, at a ratio of 1/2-3/4 tbs. per gallon . My understanding of alfalfa is that it’s pretty hot (can and will burn plants) if over used. So I want to exercise some caution until I see the effects it has.

    Well it’s been two days and we have nearly 2″ of foam, off-course the temperature here in South Florida has been in the nineties and humid. I will keep you updated after 7 days and through the feeding process.

    Again many thanks for your input!

    • Patrick

      Great! Foam is a good sign, looks like it’s going nicely. Happy to help, let us know how it goes..

  • Henry

    Patrick,

    I’m on the 19th day of fermenting the alfalfa pellets and it has a strong alcohol smell. Will the smell subside? Should I add more lacto?

    Many thanks

    • Patrick

      Hmm it should get to vinegar after alcohol. If it doesn’t shape up I’d add more sugar. It should keep going though until its more of a vinegar smell. Might still smell a little alcoholic but more vinegary.

  • Annie

    In his talk a few back in Hawaii, Gil said he does not use a rock to press down the plant, what he does is add water as without water, how can the juice be extracted. Does what he said still stand? Thank you

    • Patrick

      Yes, I was working off old material of his. He does both methods actually. Particularly for the bloom recipe that uses fruits, the ingredients have a lot of water already so you don’t need sometimes. With this recipe, you don’t need to use water if you are fermenting a large batch. In a large batch there will be enough juice from the material. However for smaller batches we use water (I always use water since I always make small batches). I will amend the recipe I think. Thanks Annie for bringing this up.

  • Henry

    Patrick,

    A little clarification please.The fertilizer[em]”Our grow formula uses 1:1 fermented plant material and fish hydrolysate.”[/em]The GROW uses 1 tblsp. per gallon,yet the fish hydro. says to use 2 tblsp. per gallon. What then would be the correct ratio?

    • Patrick

      Hey Henry,

      There’s no rule on this. The grow formula is a mixture of the fish fert and fermented extract, depending on how strong you make your fermented plant extract(how much water, if any, you use when making it) will determine how much of the final product you can mix. I’d play around with it and see what works for you. I’d start with 1 tbsp/gal and go from there. It’s kinda hard to burn your plants with this stuff, but it can be less effective if you mix it too strongly. That said I encourage you to mix larger amounts and see what happens! :)

      Patrick

  • Thank you for all the wonderful info. Very awesome. Just made an aqueous extract of moringa oleifera (no fermentation) new growth tips. I think it’s called mallungay in Philippines. Am wondering how fermentation would effect the natural growth hormones present in the plants. Rice wash is fermenting nicely for first try at lactobacillus serum. Thank you.

    • Patrick

      Awesome stuff Paul! Generally we are very positive about fermenting for growth hormones. Microbes tend to process the material to it’s base constituents which are those molecules. Good luck with the lacto, by now it should be done so I hope it turned out well for you!

      • Have generally found that excessive bacterial activity can be detrimental to baby plants, but that is easily solved by using an inert base like sand and feeding with compost tea which has been slightly augmented.

        Also, what do you prefer re: plant based insecticides/repellants? I have had success using diatomaceous earth as a spray, although there is some delay between application and eradication of the pest.

        • Patrick

          Hey Paul,

          Ginger garlic works well – all the aromatic herbs have some deterrent effects. Chili works well as a deterrent. Some plants have specific toxicity, like parsnip on mites. Diatomaceous earth is awesome, that seems like a pretty popular organic choice. Chitosan looks promising for a lot of applications in that regard, I’m making some now I’ll let you know how it goes..

          Thanks for the input that’s great.

          Patrick

  • Gaston

    Henry? Any chance I could find out how the Alfalfa ferment went? I am thinking of doing that early on next spring. Would you have suggestions for the proportions?

  • Henry

    Gaston,

    Went very well and it’s working great. At the time I made it I only had the pellets, so I soaked them in unchlorinated water til they softened,waited till the alfalfa softened and dried, pulverized them to a fine powder, and then fermented as per the above recipe.

    I started by using 1 TBL. per gallon and gradually moved up to 3 TBL. It would have been easier if I had the alfalfa meal, since it would eliminate the soaking. I hope this helps.

    • Gaston

      thanks so much Henry, I am looking forward trying it myself as alfalfa pellets are a big item in my arsenal of tools for growing my own food. Thanks again.

      • Henry

        Gaston,

        I should have added that after a couple of months there was a gelatinous substance (similar to a small squid)that I simply discarded. No foul, no harm. All is working well!

        • Patrick

          Ha ha – “like a small squid”..well like you say Henry no foul no harm!

  • Azomite mineral powder is another great way to increase the micronutrients in the soil, although I have found that acup is enough to treat an entire truckload of good compost, rather than a tablespoon per cubic foot.

    • Patrick

      Azomite looks like terrific stuff! I haven’t used it but based on the description it looks pretty cool.

      Thanks for the input!

      Patrick

  • Jonny

    can i use molasses instead of sugar?

    • Patrick

      Hi Jonny – Molasses is the best nutrient source to use!

  • Been experimenting with pyremithin daisie, nicotiana rustica and osage orange as pest repellants. Neem is fairly effective applied as a foliar spray against many things. Never tried cayenne. Thought I was getting cayenne as part of a package deal, but wound up with anaheim chilies instead, which is fine for my store, but probably not useful as a plant treatment. Will try your garlic recipe. Cheers.

  • Roger

    Sir,
    I noticed white molds from my fermented plant mixture. Is it okey or am I going to start over?

    • Patrick

      White molds are great! Watch for yellow, green or black molds though. Keep your system anaerobic as possible to keep the right species thriving.

  • Jose Kristensen

    Hi Patrick,
    Interesting to read Henry’s account of his alfalfa fermenting. I wonder it was actually a vinegar ‘mother’ that formed on top of his solution. I use such a ‘squid-like’ growth to turn red wine into good vinegar.
    On a different subject, I see lots of seaweed extract on the market. I have easy access to seaweed and wonder if there is some way to make an extract myself or do you think just using it as garden mulch is the most practical way to use it?
    Thank you for all the time and effort you put into this site. To me this is a whole new dimension of plant care. I am slowly working my way through the recipes and am keen to see the results on my plants

    • Patrick

      Thanks Jose, glad you are enjoying the material and my efforts, hah..

      Good point about Henry’s alfalfa culture.. Hey Henry! What do you think?? I have limited experience with kombucha and that type of stuff although I’m keen to start as it is closely related to all our stuff. I think that’s the same principle..

      Yeah, using your seaweed as mulch is a pretty darn good application of it.. I would still make a seaweed extract though to use as a soil drench and compost tea additive. Just use the seaweed and follow this Grow recipe. After fermentation you can use the solids leftover in the compost bin, or mixed in with the mulch (just don’t mix too much in at one time).

      Cheers,
      Patrick

      • Henry

        Hello Patrick and Greetings Jose,

        I have no clue as to whether that substance that formed (again) is Kombucha. The batch of the fermented Alfalfa was made August 17,2013. So far I have had two fair sized layers of whatever it is. When I refer to it as “squid like”, I mean just that!

        I swear I can slice it into rings and it would pass for great looking “Calamari”. Having said that I have been using the liquid portion of the mix without any ill-effects whatsoever. On the flip side I’m not sure of the exact benefits either.

        Jose you mentioned that [em]”I use such a ‘squid-like’ growth to turn red wine into good vinegar”[/em]. Can you please elaborate on what causes the latter, and maybe some uses for it?

        Thanks,
        Henry

  • Jose Kristensen

    Thanks Patrick, I’ll have a go at the seaweed fermenting.

    Hello Henry,
    To make your own cider vinegar or red wine vinegar you need to have Acetobacter, a very acidic strain of bacteria which ferments any alcoholic liquids and converts them to vinegar. The most common way to introduce this bacteria is by using Mother of vinegar, a cellulose substance made up of various Acetobacter. It looks like a very firm jelly.

    I thought what you described sounded very much like this. If you google ‘Mother of vinegar’ it will be easier for you to see images of what I use rather than have me try describe in words what it looks like. I only use the vinegar for culinary purposes but if you are throwing your ‘squid-like’ growth out then perhaps it should go under you blueberry bush or some other plant that enjoys acid soil.

    • Henry

      Jose,

      BINGO!!!!!!!!!!!!!You nailed it dead on. That’s exactly what I have ‘Mother of vinegar’. That’s very interesting. Now I’m wondering if my fermented alfalfa is too acidic? Hmmm.

  • Jose Kristensen

    Henry, I have never used it but 2-3 tablespoon vinegar in 4 liters water is supposed to help control powdery mildew. I guess if it benefits plants like zucchini then it can’t be harmful, as long as it is diluted.

    Like you, I am also wondering if I will be able to see visible benefits from using the growth solution. I aim to do a trial with half my plants getting the solution and the other half not and see if there is a difference in performance. One trial does not necessarily prove anything but if others also report their results it will help build the picture.

    • Patrick

      Guys, great to see you chatting on here, that is awesome! Can’t wait to launch the forum and really get some knowledge sharing going.

      Henry you should test the pH of that alfalfa solution, just out of curiosity. It shouldn’t be a problem to use though properly diluted.

  • jana

    hi, Patric
    I was reading about willow bark and branches to have a lot of rooting hormones. So I am thinking to make a fertilizer for improvement the root structures for my plants and for my husband’s bonsai-to-be cuttings to promote rooting and reduce the stress. I believe it will work fine with grow fertilizer.

    Additionally willow contain salicylic acid (aspirin), which can also help :)

    Since willow bark and branches are more “hard” material, do you think it will be good to prolong the fermentation time for additional week or so? Can I extract root hormons from willow with this grow formula?

    thanks
    jana

    • Patrick

      Hi Jana,

      Yeah, you should be able to extract rooting hormones with the grow fertilizer formula.. I would add more sugar in order to make a ‘stronger’ ferment, since it is a hard material. Also, make sure you cut/shred/pulverize the bark quite a bit to increase surface area and help the ferment.

      In addition, you might consider trying the tincture approach, since the bark is so tough. Follow the Ginger-Garlic recipe but with the willow bark. Just make sure you dilute appropriately since that is very alcoholic.

      Hope it works well, let us know the results! Lot’s of inquiries about willow bark on here.

      Patrick

      • jana

        Patrick,
        indeed, more sugar will help. I already make the concoction by the grow formula and it seemed OK, but after a few days a sediment was forming on the bottom and white-yellow-ish mold on the top. Since the smell was nice, I added more sugar and now it is fermenting further.

        I follow your attitude: have fun and experiment – I am a farmer, it should work!! :)

        So I will play with it as long as the smell will be fine. Thanks for advice to make a tincture. Even it is not the spring any more (ideal time), I will make it anyway.

        Other interesting thing with willow branches is happening in my garden. I had idea to put willow bark as bottom layer in my raised beds. After I peel thick branches I also cut young smaller ones to about 10 cm (to gain the benefits of willow and to make beds for worms :)).

        I didn’t fully cover this with dirt, because the rain begins – we had a fair share of rain. After 2 – 3 weeks most of this little branches developed tiny roots – up to 12 roots along this 10 cm – amazing! So I can certainly confirm that willow bark indeed have rooting hormone within :).

        • Patrick

          Hey Jana,

          Haha great post, that is awesome to hear about the willow bark in your planters! Pretty cool. I can’t wait to see how your experiments with the willow fermentation and/or tincture go. You should use on one part and then dig up the roots and compare to another part of the garden. See how it works in practice.

          Yeah, thats ok regarding the grow formula, sometimes molds form in there and you can add some sugar like you did or just leave it as long as you keep it as anaerobic as possible.

          Cheers,
          Patrick

  • Santiago Correa

    Hi Patrick
    First of all, many thanks for the really good information. I want to ask why is not possible to use different kinds of plants tips to make this grow fertilizer?
    Cheers

    Santiago

    • Patrick

      Hi Santiago,

      You can use different kinds of plants no problem. We like to ferment different plants separately though, so their ingredients don’t react with each other during fermentation. Not required but ideally would ferment separately.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • silcax

    can i still use my FPJ even there is black molds observed? black isnt dominant though since i also saw brown and white molds when tried checking it..

    thanks

    • Patrick

      Hi Silcax,

      I would avoid using it as a foliar spray. Maybe as a soil drench, ok.. You might try adding more sugar to your FPJ and sealing it up again to try and get fermentation restarted, to combat the molds.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Ajay

    is it ok if i use molasses instead of sugar??and how should i use it for soil drench??

    • Patrick

      Hi Ajay,

      Sorry for the late reply – yep molasses is the best to use actually. as soil drench, you can use it at 1-2tbsp/gallon, should be fine. For seedlings, maybe not that strong.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Peter Paul Calderon

    Hi
    Can i apply this fertilizer or any recipes indicated for orchids?

    Thanks
    Pete

    • Patrick

      Hey Pete, I apply all of them to my orchid and it’s been great. It’s budding now and the calphos seems to make a big difference. I have questions for you about it actually. Once I get the forums up we can take the discussion there maybe.

  • There are fertilizers available that are specific to orchids, made by people who really care about their plants. From what I remember, they had some information on their website about what it is that makes their formulas more effective.

  • jana

    hi, I have little update on my willow bark story.

    First how my stupidity was greatly rewarded :).
    I intend to make willow bark tincture (for human usage this time): I put grounded willow bark and vodka into jar and then – cover jar with paper towel (?) I have no idea why I did this :). Then I put jar into my kitchen cupboard. I even looked a few times and stir the mix, even noticed that vodka level is decreasing, yet still covered with paper towel each time (duh!).

    Then I forget about it for a few weeks. When I finally remembered to look – I discovered beautiful, beautiful white mold all over – I accidently made a BIM in my kitchen cupboard !! my stupidity was greatly rewarded. Sometimes you don’t need brain, just a little luck :):).

    Second – the effects of willow bark in my garden. I cannot say it was a huge difference. I noticed with 2 different vegetables with longer roots, which were able to reach willow bark level – to grow more vigorous and larger as ones in “willow untreated” soil. So it is a small success.
    I will definitely make more willow bark and willow leaves levels, I didn’t lose my courage and my curiosity :). The experiment continuous :).

    • Patrick

      Hey Jana,

      Thanks so much for sharing your experiences and experiments! That is awesome! Well, bigger growth in a couple of them, that’s good anyway.. keep experimenting and sharing with us, that’s what this site is made on!

      Cheers
      patrick

  • S.U.Kaluarachchi

    May God Bless you for sharing your knowledge with others!But sad to say we Asians are (very,very,very)poor in that respect.May good fortunes shower on you!!!!
    from Sri Lanka.

    • Patrick

      Thanks! :)

  • S.U.Kaluarachchi

    Is it possible to use vermicompost or its tea in place of “Fish hydrolysate”or anything that doesn’t require fish/meat?
    Thanx.

    • Patrick

      Well you can, and vermicompost will have a decent amount of nitrogen in it, but not as much as fish hydrolysate. Or you would need a lot more. Like 1 tbsp of fish hydrolysate would be equivalent to 4 cups of vermicompost (I have no idea what the real comparison would be but you get the idea). But if you have a lot of vermicompost and don’t want to deal with meat, that’ll work ok.

  • Justin

    I mean 1 TBSP/gal****

  • Suhail

    Hi , really very good information with details .thank you for that
    i have an inquiry pleas
    Can i make (plant growth formula) with :
    5 killos of plants
    1 liter of Molasses
    and add 8-9 liter of water
    and add some lacto bacteria and spoon of yeast ?

    and i have another inquiry a bout how to mack ((fermented fruit juice ))
    can i add water to this fermentation ?
    and can i mack it with 5 killo of fruit and 1 liter of molasses ..is that possible ?
    thanks

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