Ginger-Garlic Extract

This is an awesome product for plants and animals.  It boosts the immune system and helps fight insect and fungal pests.  Ginger-Garlic is a common and very useful variation so I’m discussing it here, but you can use any combination of plants for whatever effect you are going for.


How to Make:

Ginger and Garlic are quite difficult to ferment, or extract active ingredients from.  By adding fermented liquid already like beer or wine, the active ingredients in Ginger and Garlic are more easily fermented.  Then we add sugar.  Remember, sugar gives the microbes energy to continue fermentation.  After letting this sit for a week or so, you arrest fermentation and enhance potency by adding a strong alcohol.  Here’s how to make:

  1. Get an equal amount of Ginger and Garlic, but keep them separate.  As a rule of thumb, we try to ferment each material separately as you do not know if there is interaction when mixed.  Once materials are fermented they are much more stable and compatible.
  2. Put in container and fill with beer or wine until it is covered.  Leave for 12-24hrs.
  3. Add 1/3 sugar(crude sugar is best).  E.g. if you have 1L worth of ginger-garlic soaking in beer/wine, you would add 1/3kg sugar.
  4. Ferment this for 7-10 days.  Longer the better.
  5. After that time, add alcohol to arrest the fermentation process.  Use at least 40%, or 80 proof.
  6. Leave this mixture for 10 days.  This allows the extraction process to take place, where the beneficial ingredients of the ginger/garlic are extracted with the alcohol.
  7. After 10 days drain the fluid from this concoction.
  8. You separated the ingredients in Step 1 and fermented them separately. Now that they are fermented you can mix them to make ginger-garlic extract!

TIP:  Potency depends on the part of the plant you use.  Generally, seeds have the greatest potency, then fruit, leaf, roots, and stems in that order.

How to Use:

Add 1tbsp per gallon of water. 

Plants

  • Treat fungal problems of plants (Sulphur from Garlic is good fungicide)
  • Use as insecticide (add chili to fermentation to make it hot)
  • Ginger is good natural antibiotic/preventative medicine for plants

Animals

  • Garlic is good natural antibiotic/preventative medicine for animals
  • This has been used with livestock to keep them healthy, and to help them get over being sick.  For example keeping chicks/chickens in a crowded pen healthy
  • Used for rheumatism in humans (very good anti-inflammatory)
  • Used as an antibiotic.  For daily usage we drink 1tbsp/day in a glass of water.  If we feel weakening, coughs, colds, flu, etc, we’ll take 1tbsp 3 times/day for 3 days.  This is not medical advice I’m just saying how we use this extract.
  • If you’re interested google the applications of ginger-garlic.  There are many indications for ginger-garlic not described here.

This extract has a myriad of uses in both plants and humans.  Feel free to modify the recipe, adding plants as you see fit – chili, neem fruit, curry fruit, marigold for potency, etc.  We look at the fermented extracts as food, food supplement to plants, animals and humans.  They are simple food, more concentrated nutrients.  You can ferment anything except poisons.  The formulations may vary widely, simply mix and match as you see fit.  Just experiment!

  • Alvin

    How long is the fermentation of garlic and ginger in beer or wine ? And how do I know when it is fermented ? As to the potency, is that mean if I add other material in the process of fermentation, it will boost the effectiveness of ginger-garlic extract or other beneficial effects ?

    • Patrick

      Hi Alvin, leave the ginger and garlic in the beer/wine for 0.5-1 day. For us here in Manila it’s hot so would probably only take half a day. But leaving it for longer is fine. Then you add the sugar, 1/3 sugar, and leave for 7-10 days. Again because it is hot here it will probably be on the faster side, like 7 days. But if you leave it longer no problem. But normally, we add the hard alcohol after 7-10 days. Add equal part Gin (San Miguel Gin! haha because it is so cheap) at that point.

      I would play with adding more ingredients to the mix. I like to add other plants like Chili and aromatic herbs. Chili is hot, so it is a good repellent. Aromatic herbs have insect repellent properties also. These would be Coriander, Basil, Dill, Peppermint, etc – the herbs that have a strong smell.

      • Alvin

        Hi Patrick, Thanks for the reply. I got another question. It says in the recipe that we separate the two materials during fermentation. So we will just mix the two solutions on 7th step ?

        • Patrick

          Yep that’s correct. I’ve updated the instructions to make it more clear also. Thanks!

      • Chelsa

        Patrick, when do you add in the other materials, like chili or dill? Do we add this when we add the sugar or when we mix with beer/wine?

        • Patrick

          Hi Chelsa, you would add that when you add the beer/wine ideally, but you could also just ferment them (e.g. sugar step) if you didn’t want to do that step. It’s pretty flexible.

      • Aldrin Ditching

        What do you mean Add equal part of Gin? What is the quantity of gin or alcohol?

        • Patrick

          Sorry that means 1:1. So if you have 1 L of solution so far, after all the above steps, now you add 1 L of gin or alcohol.

          • Aldrin Ditcing

            Thanks Patrick for your reply.

  • Drew

    Greetings! I’m a bit concerned about the alcohol that develops during fermentation, as well as the hard alcohol added at the end. I’ve been in contact with other natural gardeners who have made FPE’s and used them on their plants. They claim the alcohol killed their roots. Now I am aware that alcohol is bad for roots, but at what concentration? I’ve been researching this topic a bit and found an interesting paper about an experiment done on Paperwhite Narcissus (Narcissus tazetta). They were using ethanol as a growth inhibiter. It worked wonders between 1 and 5% concentration, and didn’t become toxic to the plant until 10%! This just blew me away.

    So what have I missed in my research? Why are these people so set against using fermentation as a method of extracting nutrients/compounds? Their overall experiences were so bad apparently that they prefer to use the water soak/rot method (botanical tea). This is not as an effective method for extraction, and can still go anaerobic if not properly monitored. It only extracts water soluble goodies from the material. So what possibly might they have done wrong while building their FPE’s? Perhaps over application? I have a lot of fermentations going right now to be used when spring finally arrives. What do you think?

    Thanks for your time,

    Drew

    • Patrick

      Hi Drew,

      Thanks for joining the thread. We’ve used ginger-garlic and other fermented plant+alcohol mixes quite successfully so I’m not sure what they are doing to harm the plants. As you said alcohol in too high concentrations is definitely bad for plants. However at the application rates we suggest they will be fine. Don’t overmix! This stuff is acidic as well as containing alcohol. But used at the correct dilution it is very effective. That said, if you are still worried you can use it strictly as a foliar spray. We generally use it as a foliar spray since the ginger discourages crawling pests, but periodically as a soil drench too no problem. Gil might have something to add to this lets see.

      • Pier

        You mention that it can be used as a soil drench. What are the issues you are trying to tackle with that method. Would this also work on a nematode problem in parsley?

        • Patrick

          The soil drench is for the immune boost effects for the plant, taken up by the roots. I dunno if it would work for your nematode problem though..

  • Big Ray

    I have been collecting what I hope is mycorrhizae from areas near me that have been undisturbed for years. My plan, since reading here is to start collecting soil/roots from areas that have similar plants to the ones I intend to grow.

    Since this is an anti-fungal, should I avoid spraying this in areas of my garden where I want the beneficial fungus to proliferate?

    • Patrick

      Should be fine as a foliar spray. You really want the fungal colonies in the soil to remain undisturbed so I’d avoid using it as a soil drench. We usually don’t do that except when we want to battle pathogenic root fungi and give the plants a big immune boost.

  • joe

    High
    I have heard of these recipes, but seeing everything in one spot is amazing.

    my question is, would kombucha work in the begining, as a fermented beverage, that contains only trace alcohol??? (if any.) instead of beer or wine? {not from a stance against alcohol, only that kombucha seems to work against powdery mildew on its own, short term.)

    Is there an alternate way of arresting fermentation? I heard high heat will stop fermentation, but would kill beneficial microbes as well

    Thanks SSOOOO much for sharing this info, and all of the other stuff
    Peace

  • joe

    i meant to add that interest in alternate ways of arresting fermentation are due to the desire for all home made stuff,

    and will wild ginger work? (Asarum caudatum). As we have this growing wild, and we have a little garlic to plant, as well. Aiming for self sufficiency in a land over-run with GMO trash and food traveling around the globe , instead of down the road, to peoples dinner plates.

    Peace

  • joe

    SOOO sorry to triple post. My ol lady is making tea right now, and dehydrating ginger for it(she makes herbal tea)
    am i correct in assuming i can use all her peelings of ginger(I dont want to take it from her tea-making supply)
    Thanks once again
    Peace

    • Patrick

      Hi Joe,

      Welcome to the site! Ha, no problem with the comments we appreciate the enthusiasm. Yes I think wild ginger would work fine, it is aromatic right? It might not be quite as potent as the ginger we use in food as that is selected for aroma and potency, but I think it will work, try it. Using kombucha in Step 2, honestly I don’t know but I’ll ask Gil. We use alcohol in Step 5 not only to arrest fermentation, but also to extract enzymes and such that are alcohol-soluble rather than water-soluble. Just ferment your own hard alcohol and use that! I think Gin is the easiest to make homemade not sure though. Anyway if you have any other questions let me know, happy to help.

  • gil carandang

    ginger-garlic extract is very similar to homeopathic tincture. normally herbs are soaked with alcohol as the regular procedure. in our case, we ferment first the materials like ginger and garlic. we then arrest fermentation with the addition of alcohol. in this process, we “eradicate” the microbes, and get “pure” active ingredients of the ginger and garlic. when we use it, when we drink it, it is more potent and easily assimilated by our body. alcohol is lighter than water. alcohol, use in tincture is an old way of extracting active ingredients on any materials we use. remember our technique is fermenting it first then add the alcohol (and make tincture).
    next time around, i will talk about my new “kombucha” extracted from turmeric and guava. the “mold” by-product “gelatin” of the fermentation is now what i use to further extract, “grow” by just using water with sugar. the finished product is a very nutritious drink for humans and animals and even foliar for the plants. this time around, we don’t need to use the original turmeric or guava materials – just the by-product “gelatin”. definitely, much simpler – yet very effective. this is the new “kombucha”.

  • gil carandang

    use of alcohol and heat will generally arrest fermentation. afterall, fermentation is the process or bioactivity of microorganisms.

  • gil carandang

    of course you can use the peelings. in fact, i remember when i was in thailand, this mexican american apprentice at pun pun farm taught me how to make wine out of pineapple. when he harvested a pineapple, he peeled it (fermented these peels and made them to wine!). of course, we ate the pineapple meat and planted the crown. and instead of throwing the peelings, made them to pineapple wine.

  • fungusumungus

    Hello everyone thanks for all the great information can’t wait to get started. How much alcohol do you add to arrest the fermentation?

    • Patrick

      Good question, I’ll have to update the recipe soon. Add equal part alcohol. If you have 1L of beer with garlic in it, add 1L hard alcohol. It just needs to be 80 proof(40%), so buy the cheapest you can find. We get Gin here for about $1/L, there are cheap brands in the states too though.

  • samb

    thanks for all the info and would like to know if there is an alternative way to extract i.e with out using alcohol.

    • Patrick

      Hi Samb,

      This is basically a tincture recipe, so it depends on alcohol to extract some of the active ingredients. I’m not sure of other methods to achieve the same results. You might research classic tinctures and see if they have alternatives. I’ll talk to Gil about it also. Good question!

  • Peter

    Hi Patrick, got a question after reading all the comments and replies, I would be using a glass jar for the fermentation, should I tightly seal the jar during the all the way from 1st to the last step ? Isn’t it alcohol will vaporize when not seal in a container ?

    • Patrick

      I wouldn’t seal it until Step 5. For the other steps I would have the lid on but not tightened all the way down, so that some air can still escape. Once you add the hard liquor and arrest fermentation, you should be fine to seal it up.

  • Juan

    hi ,how many grams of ginger and garlic should i use to make 1 lt of solution ?
    thank you ,juan

    • Patrick

      Hi Juan,

      Play with the recipe to see how much works for you.. I’d try 1/4 liter worth of each, chopped up. Not sure how many grams that will come to, depends how much water is in them and such..

      Thanks,
      Patrick

  • Annie

    Re Mosquitos
    Please help me, the municipal council lot are disallowing me to store water in my garden. I tried telling them I need decholinated water for my plants but they said I cannot store it as fear of mossies breeding in it causing Dengue and Malaria. Can I use LAB after I use Abate in my water? I am so afraid Abate will kill my precious microbes in the soil. Will using LA therefore neutalise the Abate? Thanks. My ginger/garlic is not ready for use yet.

    • Patrick

      Good question Annie, it looks like Abate is fairly targeted towards mosquito and gnat larvae. That said there are concerns about hazard to beneficial insects, and it is toxic to shrimp and crabs, so soil crustaceans will likely be at risk. I imagine it will harm some beneficial microbes but not all. You can use LAB in the water after Abate, but I doubt it would neutralize the Abate, Abate is made with temephos which is a reasonably persistent chemical. Probably just flush with clean water as much as possible between abate treatments.

  • Annie

    Thanks Patrick, thats what I was afraid of, I cannot understand these one track minded officers, honestly. Nothing I tell them will make them see there are no mossies breeding as there isnt time to breed, its not as if I store the water weeks on end. Sigh If any one reading this have any solutions, please tell me? Thanks

    • Drew

      There are water filters available online that will fit on the end of your hose spigot. You then just connect your hose to the filter. Voila! Dechlorinated water for use as you need it. No water sitting around for critters to breed in and no need to use poisons. I bought one for the new community garden that I’m involved with. I too did not want to kill by microbes. I’m not sure if you live in the US. I would imagine spigot fittings are probably different in other parts of the world. Try http://www.friendsofwater.com in California. That’s where I got mine.

      Pat, I apologize ahead of time if posting websites is against the rules. I thought this might help Annie.

      • Patrick

        No problem! You can post whatever site you want, especially if it’s to help out another member. Thanks Drew!

  • Annie

    Thanks Drew, I live in Malaysia, but I’ll ask at the shops to see if they stock it.

  • Annie

    How do I extract from the garlic ginger again after the 1st time? Do I add in wine and then later on add the alcohol all over again? Thanks

    • Patrick

      Hey Annie, yep that should work fine. But you don’t need to wait the 12-24hrs, you can just add beer/wine and sugar. You can ferment this as many times as you’d like. Each time drain the liquid off, add more liquid/sugar to start next round.

  • Annie

    Can rice wine be used instead of red or white wine? Thanks

    • Patrick

      Should be ok if it’s around the same alcohol content. Not really sure but try it :)

      • Annie

        I meant at the beer/wine stage, not the liquour stage.

  • dayne

    could isopropyl alcohol be use to arrest the fermentation? If so, and it’s twice as strong (91% alc), would you just use half as much?

    • Patrick

      yes, you could use isopropyl alcohol I believe but I would be careful with it, that is strong stuff! I’m not sure if it works that way (twice as strong so use half as much..) it might not be a linear relationship like that. Anyway try it and see. Make sure you dilute it appropriately. And let us know how it goes!

  • Philip Lasimbang

    Very good and interesting. Will follow your works

  • Carmelo

    Can we used other fermented materials instead wine like vinegar and etc.

    • Patrick

      Hi Carmelo,

      I think vinegar is too far along in the fermentation process to be used in this stage of the recipe. You want “younger” fermentation materials. If you leave wine/beer out long enough it turns to vinegar – there are still enough sugars in it to keep fermenting, and that’s the process you want to tap into. So for this reason I’d stick with beer/wine there..

      Cheers,
      Patrick

      • Carmelo

        Okay, thanks for your reply.

      • Joel

        I use 1 kg fermented ginger and garlic:1 gal coco vinegar instead of beer and wine and it workout fine it heals wounds and skin rashes and deworms my pigs and chickens and I use it to disinfect the bedding of my piglets by spraying it. I don’t use expensive beer or alcoholic wine they contain something i don’t know . just dilute it by 20 parts or 5 parts water or try any ratio you like and observe. Try it or discard it I’m using it for 2 years. I even treated my father arms and legs with rashes after 24 hours he said its effective it dries up and heals fast.

        • Patrick

          Excellent contribution, thank you for sharing! This could be an addendum to the recipe.

        • Chelsa

          Hello Joel, when you say coco vinegar, is this fermented juice made from the coconut fronds section? In Guam, men hang a bottle from a hole made in the center of the leaves…sort of…and it catches the juice and they ferment it to make an alcoholic drink and then ferment it longer to make vinegar. Is this what you mean?

          • Patrick

            Yep Chelsa, that would be coco vinegar and you could use that.

  • Sheen Rey

    Does the amount of garlic and ginger matter during preparation? Do I need to weight the amount of ginger and garlic?

    Thanks

    • Sheen Rey

      Follow up question, can you specify atleast 3 insects that can be controlled by this product?

      Thanks again

      • Patrick

        I think general purpose fungicide is the greatest benefit of this mixture. But it should act as a deterrent for piercing/sucking insects like aphids. I’ll have to ask Gil for more details there.

    • Patrick

      Hi Sheen,

      Not really, they can vary. We usually use roughly the same amount of each though. Ferment them separately before combining. You can use more or less of either depending on what you’re after. They vary slightly in their properties of course.

      Cheers
      Patrick

      • Sheen Rey

        Ok, thank you patrick for the response

  • Marty Baecker

    Maybe I missed it,,,,,but when you add the alcohol to arrest the fermentation,,,,,how much do you add? What proportion?

    Thanks

    • Patrick

      A lot. 1:1 alcohol. You can use less, but the alcohol extracts some of the ingredients you’re looking for – like a tincture.

  • silcax

    hi, after straining the liquid. can we use again the materials?i mean for the next cycle of fermentation, if so , how long will be the fermenting days?thank you

    • Patrick

      Yep, you can do a second fermentation. After you drain off the liquid, I would mash up the ginger/garlic since they should be softer after the first fermentation. To ferment a second time just start back at Step 3, where you add the sugar.

      • silcax

        thanks for your response. i have another question how many days do i need to wait after step 3? is the time frame the same as the first fermentation?

        • Patrick

          Yep, I just use the same timeframes as the first fermentation, although it should be a little faster since there are already so many microbes in there.

  • Hi Patrick,
    For the wine or beer, I was thinking it would be best to be unpasteurized, which would mean making my own. Do you suggest this? or will any beer or wine do? I was going to make Makgeolli,since I first learned about this in the Korean Natural Farming publications.

    • Patrick

      Wow, interesting, that would be fun to make..I’m sure that would be better than just using store-bought stuff. However the store-bought stuff works great. It’s that same old argument “no right way, but one way that is probably better than the other”..

  • Chelsa

    Feels like a sort of silly question, but do we peel the garlic or just dump in as whole cloves?

    • Patrick

      I’d dump them in whole. But the more you shred them the better. basically put the whole cloves in blender, peel and all. Blend up then use.

      • Bradley

        Patrick,

        I’ve read through this posting several times and this is the first mention of using a blender to mince the garlic and ginger. I assume that this is part of step 1, which should be included in the recipe. I’ll be starting a batch of this in a week or so and I had been planning on just chopping the stuff up small on a cutting board. Should I plan on blending it instead?

        • Patrick

          Hey Bradley,

          You can do either one. The original recipe is just to chop up the ginger. That works well. But really, the more surface area the more complete the ferment – I like blending all ingredients for all recipes though. No problem either way its kinda personal preference. Easier to just mash them or cut roughly but if you have access to blender, I like that way best.

          Cheers,
          Patrick

  • bigcow

    Hi there, I fermented ginger and garlic with beer as per the instructions and I thought I’d try fermenting chilli in the same way with the same ratio. Several days after adding brown sugar to all three bottles, a whitish layer developed on top of the ginger and chilli liquid. It doesn’t smell bad. The garlic bottle did not develop this layer, so I’m guessing it’s some kind of fungus and it’s probably soil-borne since I didn’t wash the ginger/garlic/chilli that I bought from the market. It’s been about a week and I’m about to add alcohol to the mixtures, so I’m wondering if I should ignore the white layer? If this is beneficial fungus, I’m thinking of scooping it out and growing it separately in another brown sugar/LAB solution to add to my bokashi mixture. Any thoughts?

    • Patrick

      You can do either one. It should be a beneficial fungal or bacterial growth so you can leave it, or add to your compost/bokashi/etc.. Nice work!

  • chekky

    I know alcohol is used here to arrest fermentation. But if I were to skip step 1 (fermemting herds/garlic/ginger) and instead soak the garlic and ginger (separately) in alcohol, mainly to extravt their essential oils. Then adding these alcohol +essential oil to my EM1 to make into EM5, does it make senses? Or I am talking about something totally off track/ wrong here. Pls advise, thanks.

    • Patrick

      Hi Chekky, I can’t comment too much since I haven’t done it, but my feeling would be to still do the first step regardless. You can try just getting the tincture part and adding to EM 1, but probably only at very low concentration so you don’t kill the microbes/spores there.

  • Chelsa

    What does it look like after I add the sugar and it’s fermenting? Is something supposed to be happening visually? Is it supposed to be bubbling or fizzing? Right now I have all the garlic and white floating above what looks like liquid brown sugar and then crystal brown sugar. Should I add more wine?

    • Chelsa

      Hi Patrick, I hope to hear from you soon. Although I am sure you are quite busy. I’m at the stage where there is wine, ginger and brown sugar mixed together. A white film developed on top. Is this normal or okay? Should I toss the whole mixture and start over?

      • Patrick

        White film is ok, it’s good in fact. Just don’t use if it turns green or black..

    • Patrick

      It should release gasses at that stage. You might stir it to mix it up and get the sugar to dissolve. Not sure what else to do there but i’d say you have enough beer/wine if the ingredients can float. :)

      • Chelsa

        Thank you for the feedback!! I will mix everything. I’m now at the stage when I can add alcohol.

  • Shani

    Instead of beer or wine could we use yeast?
    Or Will the yeast turn the whole thing into alcohol?

    • Patrick

      Well we use beer/wine because it contains yeast but I’m not sure about using the pure yeast. I’d stick with the beer/wine for this step..

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Peter P

    Very interesting site you have, thank you for all your time, patience and effort.
    I have been soaking garlic in alcohol for quite some time and using the juice on salads along with olive oil as a dressing. I recently got into Ginger and got tired of throwing away half of what I was buying so I took a root and emulsified it in a blender with vodka. This has now been in my fridge for two months and is still as potent as ever. Following up on this I did the same with a few heads of garlic. Now, when cooking, I add the ginger and garlic (1/4 -1/2 tsp) at the very end of my cooking cycle rather than at the beginning. The aroma’s are beautiful and you can definitely taste the spices in the food.
    I never used either of these on plants.
    My question, What would be the gain in fermenting either concoction and would the taste be different?
    peter p

    • Patrick

      Hey Peter, thanks for visiting..you know I’m not sure the different benefits for people..for pants the organic acids produced through fermentation are great. Taste wise, it will taste more sour but probably not at the rate you are applying. You might not notice the difference that way. Try it!

  • Shani

    I think the white film is good, white molds are always good i think. I would just follow instruction and not worry about what happens. Then ask about the end product. Good luck!
    White molds are usually good bacteria!

    • Patrick

      Exactly. Cheers!

    • Chelsa

      Thank you Shani and Patrick. That’s what I thought but I need verification to feel confident about it.

      • Gal

        Hi
        I have a film on my chili extract that is looking to get green (around 9 days old)
        should I get rid of it before adding the hard alcohol?

        • Patrick

          Hi Gal – sorry for the late reply this is probably moot now. But yes, I would remove it before adding the alcohol. If it looks like green mold, it is less than ideal.
          Patrick

  • Matt

    Hi Patrick/Gil,

    Apologies if I am missing some very basic info here, but what is the benefit of doing the microbial fermentation prior to the alcohol-based extraction? I am very familiar with alcohol-extracted tinctures and have made my own many times, but it seems to me the microbes would die when adding the 40% alcohol, so what’s the purpose of the fermentation prior to extraction?

    Not questioning your methods…they are just new to me and I’m interested :) Thanks!

    • Patrick

      Great question Matt – we ferment first with microbes, to liberate enzymes/hormones prior to the tincture step. You are exactly right, when you add the alcohol the microbes die, but you still have their byproducts which is what we’re after there.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Rik

    Hello Patrick and Gil,

    I do not know if you guys already answered the same question but I would like to ask if I can use brewers yeast instead of beer. Another question, is there any dis/advantage if I throw it in the blender prior to brewing?

    • Patrick

      Blender should be great! Will help the fermentation greatly. I dunno, I haven’t played around with the brewers yeast method. I would just use beer/wine if you can get some cheap.

  • reimarc marblla

    hi! do ginger and garlic good to combine? and may i know whats its chemical formula?..

    • Patrick

      You can combine them once fermented. Ferment and tincture them separately. Ginger and Garlic don’t have chemical formulas per se, they are made up of all kinds of molecules.

  • reimarc

    um sorry i mean the chemical structure?

  • alex

    I’ve been making lacto-fermented vegetables (including garlic) using a salt brine method. Could i use this fermented garlic in place of your method or is the alcohol a necessary ingredient?

    • Patrick

      Hi Alex,

      Yeah, you should still use alcohol, we need the alcohol to extract some of the relevant enzymes – they are not water-soluble but are alcohol-soluble.

      cheers – Patrick

  • Nino

    Hi Patrick,
    I find the discussion very interesting but I’m very new to this.
    May I know what type of container to use during fermentation and the rest of the processes (plastic, clay pot, glass, etc.)?
    Also, what’s the preferred location (exposed to sunlight, shaded area, etc)?
    What’s the preferred temperature and humidity?

    Thank you.

    Nino

    • Patrick

      Hey Nino,

      Great to have you! Hope you are making some things and enjoying it! You can use any of those you listed actually.. i use plastic containers cause they are so easy to find.

      best to do the recipes away from direct sunlight, like in the shade.

      temperature depends, but you should be fine with 20 C and up. Even less is ok but not ideal for microbial growth. Above 40 is also less than ideal for microbial growth.

      cheers
      Patrick

  • Emil 3

    Hello! Can I use coco-sugar instead of muscovado? The extract will be for human consumption so I want to keep the ingredients as organic as possible.

    • Patrick

      Hi Emil,

      You can use coco sugar, though i’m not sure how much anti-microbial properties it retains. I know some coconut things like coconut oil have anti-microbial properties, though I composted copra meal no problem. Anyway I think you’re fine using that although it’s very expensive in my experience.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Ed

    Hi Patrick,

    Just added brown sugar to my garlic/beer mix. Do I add 1-2 tbsp diluted lacto to kick- start the fermentation process?

    • Patrick

      Hi Ed,

      You can but no need I think – the beer has lots already that will be going to town on it.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Benjamin

    Hi Patrick, would like to ask, after fermenting the garlic and ginger, do you use the drained fluid ? or just dispose it down the drain ? Another question is, during the entire process, can i add any oil inside it? oil such as Virgin Coconut oil ? thank you !

    • Patrick

      Hi Benjamin,

      Sorry that’s poorly written I need to fix it – you will be using the drained fluid, that’s your extract. It’s like a tincture. The solids you can put in the compost pile.

      VCO is great to use for pest control, but we don’t add it into this recipe. I think if you’re going to use it, should be added right before you spray your plants. But more testing is needed there, maybe someone else who has used oils for pest control can pitch in.

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • James

    Hey Patrick, My question is, why is the stopping of the fermentation process vital ? And have you or anyone tried doing this with heat ? :). Peace brother

    • Patrick

      Hey James, you want to stop fermentation so that you don’t lose some specific compounds to off gassing. Some volatile compounds are needed for the insecticide benefit that get off gassed during fermentation. At least that’s what I was taught. I haven’t tried the recipe with heat – try it! Then post your results on the forums!

      Cheers
      Patrick

  • Mary Lindsey

    WOW! This is the first time I have heard of these techniques! We get terrible blight on our tomato plants during the summer. Do you have a recipe for such? I live in Alabama where it is hot and humid in the summer.
    Thanks!

    • Patrick

      Hi Mary,

      That’s tough, I can ask Gil about that.. I would try regular (like, weekly) applications of BIM + Immuboost. Dilute and mist the whole garden if you can, in evening or morning. Good luck and let us know how it goes!

      Cheers,
      Patrick

  • Rollray Galguerra

    i have a calamansi tree in a big container in the past it bear fruits but last year(2014) it fail to produce flowers.i checked the tree and found many red ants and i was wondering if the ginger garlic can cure my tree?if not can you suggest other cure
    thanks great job,
    rolly

    • Patrick

      That’s a tough one. Ants aren’t bothered by the sprays much. If you can get a bunch of ants and ferment them that might work as a deterrent. Another that might work would be the fermented crab/shrimp shells recipe.. Actually I haven’t posted that one yet but it’s coming – it’s awesome!

  • ZAK

    is this effective against mole crickets?

  • flictee

    Good day Patrick,

    Can I mix this with other recipes? Like the LAB, BIM, BLOOM, etc..

  • kit

    Hi PAtrick, can I use for step 1 coconut wine or lambanog, and add it again in step 5 instead of gin, thank you

    • Patrick

      Yep I think that shouldn’t be a problem. Use the weaker one (wine) in the first step, and the more alcoholic one (lambanog) in Step 5..

      • kris

        sir…..what to add if “crude sugar and molasses” are not available

  • kris

    sir…..what will i add in place of crude sugar(if it is not available)

  • kris

    can i use molasses(processed product which is available in market)in place of crude sugar

  • Gaston

    Hello Patrick

    Quick question; I noticed that towards the last line you mention ‘marigold for potency’. Just curious. Is it in relation to essential oil production as in fine herbs in flowers or in relation to taste. Infinitely curious about that one.

    Thanks in advance

    • Gaston

      sorry Patrick, I got it, it’s meant to be an ingredient in the insecticide. Cool.

  • Justin

    Hello, I’d like to make a willow bark\root extract for cuttings and young roots. Should I use wine and then sugar as in the garlic ginger recipe or should I use just sugar and some bim? Thanks as always for the great help

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